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Students launch balloon into near-space

WILKES-BARRE, LUZERNE COUNTY (WBRE/WYOU) - For some students, outer space is only reachable through textbooks. But those attending the Hazleton Area Academy of Sciences, were able to fly to the edge of space. They recently launched their version of a weather balloon.  Madison Chartrand and Stephen Tressler, both juniors, helped make the device that captured these images of the earth.
    
They used some recycled material and strategically placed still cameras inside the device and a gopro on the lid, to get the job done. Chartrand handled GPS tracking of the balloon.

"One of them is a phone GPS tracker that hung inside the payload container and the other is an APRS tracker that we used to track above 3,000 feet," said Chartrand.

The project was part of the robotics curriculum to see if they could build, test and recover a ballon payload. It forced students to think outside the box when it comes to science and engineering.

"You see these weather balloons going up in the sky and you wonder what goes into it. It's very simple once you get down to it," said Tressler.    

The balloon burst at an altitude near 102 thousand feet. It took about an hour and 20 minutes to get that high and another 20 minutes for it to descend near the Appalachian Trail in Wind Gap.

They then recovered it using the GPS tracker. Educators say hands-on projects like this help get students more excited about learning.

"I had one student that worked every day to make sure the camera was taking pictures," said John Berta, the lead instructor behind the project.

And students say with the help of their teacher, when it comes to learning, the sky is the limit.

"I think anybody can learn and grow and do something like this," said


Students in a local school district are taking science and engineering education to new heights, literally!

WILKES-BARRE, LUZERNE COUNTY (WBRE/WYOU) - For some students, outer space is only reachable through textbooks. But those attending the Hazleton Area Academy of Sciences, were able to fly to the edge of space. They recently launched their version of a weather balloon.  Madison Chartrand and Stephen Tressler, both juniors, helped make the device that captured these images of the earth.
    
They used some recycled material and strategically placed still cameras inside the device and a gopro on the lid, to get the job done. Chartrand handled GPS tracking of the balloon.

"One of them is a phone GPS tracker that hung inside the payload container and the other is an APRS tracker that we used to track above 3,000 feet," said Chartrand.

The project was part of the robotics curriculum to see if they could build, test and recover a ballon payload. It forced students to think outside the box when it comes to science and engineering.

"You see these weather balloons going up in the sky and you wonder what goes into it. It's very simple once you get down to it," said Tressler.    

The balloon burst at an altitude near 102 thousand feet. It took about an hour and 20 minutes to get that high and another 20 minutes for it to descend near the Appalachian Trail in Wind Gap.

They then recovered it using the GPS tracker. Educators say hands-on projects like this help get students more excited about learning.

"I had one student that worked every day to make sure the camera was taking pictures," said John Berta, the lead instructor behind the project.

And students say with the help of their teacher, when it comes to learning, the sky is the limit.

"I think anybody can learn and grow and do something like this," said Chartrand.

 


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