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GOP Nominates Jim Mulligan as Nominee for Scranton Mayor

With just about three months until Election Day, the Republican party of Lackawanna County has selected an attorney to run for Scranton mayor.
With just about three months until Election Day, the Republican Party of Lackawanna County has selected an attorney to run for Scranton mayor.

Jim Mulligan says he's not a politician but is ready to lead the city out of some of its darkest days.

Mulligan says it's time for voters to elect someone that will stand up and make tough decisions and not just kick the can down the road.

That road may be a challenging one.

Mulligan is getting a late start in the race and will run against Democratic candidate Bill Courtright who has been campaigning for months.

"I'm not a politician. I've never held political office and Mr. Courtright has and he has a political record and he's going to have to defend that record in debates that we have," Mulligan said.

Mulligan will replace Gary Lewis on the November ballot. Lewis won the May primary but later withdrew from the race.

Mulligan says he's prepared to lead, citing his experience as a city solicitor and work representing the Office of Economic & Community Development and Scranton Sewer Authority.

He says the city's finances will be his biggest priority.

"Looking at the structural deficit, which is about eight million dollars, I think that is one of the key isues that's going to be front-and-center in connection with this campaign," Mulligan said. "I'm prepared to come up with a strategic plan in order to find solutions for that kind of debt."

As Mulligan prepares to open a campaign office on Wyoming Avenue, he'll have the uphill battle against Courtright.

As a former city councilman and current tax collector, Courtright is running in a heavily democratic city.

"The six years that I spent on city council, people saw on live TV what I was like every week so there's no guess work. They know what they're going to get with me," Courtright said.

Both men say they want to run a "clean" campaign and focus on the city's pressing issues.

"I don't view this as a label issue. I don't view it as a "R" or a "D" issue," Mulligan said. "This is a Scranton issue. We're all Scrantonians. We all want an improved quality of life. We want to be solvent."
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