12 Million Dollars Will Flow Back to Lycoming County

12 Million Dollars Will Flow Back to Lycoming County

This from Natural Gas companies working in Pennsylvania. A state law called Act 13 makes the payments possible
Montoursville, Lycoming County- More than 12 million dollars will soon flow back to communities in Lycoming County.

This from Natural Gas companies working in Pennsylvania.

A state law called Act 13 makes the payments possible.

"Act 13 it has been the most significant piece of legislation for rural Pennsylvania that has come down the pike in maybe 75 years or more."
County leadership studied what was needed the most, including repairs to roads and more housing. Natural Gas dollars blends with private investment to create a ripple effect,'' Lycoming County Commissioner Jeff Wheeland, said.

"Our four point seven million we have invested to date has leveraged or begotten 88.7 million dollars in projects," Planning Department Deputy Bill Kelly Director, said.

An example of how they are using the money can be seen here at the Memorial Homes project in Williamsport.

The impact fees have been put to work to build forty affordable apartments and later on 32 townhouses.

"I don't want people to think the gas industry created the whole housing issue in Lycoming County, but it brought it to a head and it exasterbated the issues that were already present in housing,"  said Planning Department Director Kurt Hausammann.

In nearby Montoursville, they are selling up to one million gallons of water a day to Natural Gas Companies, this on top of the impact fees.

Last year they used the money buy a new plow truck. Act 13 provides guidelines and categories when it comes time to spend the money.

"And we look at those categories and we say to ourselves what do we need water infrastructure, safety, our police department to purchase a police car. Do we need transportation? How about our roads, part of transportation, do we have any bridges we need to repair?' Montoursville Mayor John Dorin said.

Every time money is spent from impact fees, communities must file paperwork with the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission.

This in an effort to keep track of every dollar, in an attempt to make sure the money does the most good. We're live in Williamsport
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