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Buddy Check: Student Recruits People for Rare Cancer Study

<p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt; line-height: normal;" class="MsoNormal"><font style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: 12px;"><font style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: 13px;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman;"><span style='color: black; font-family: "Century Gothic","sans-serif"; font-size: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma; mso-themecolor: text1;'>If you live in Luzerne County, you&nbsp;have the unique opportunity to take part in a life-changing cancer study. </span><span style='color: black; font-family: "Century Gothic","sans-serif"; font-size: 10pt; mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-font-family: Tahoma; mso-themecolor: text1;'>But it won't just be your life that is affected.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p></span></span></font></font></p>
Kingston, Luzerne County- "It's a problem that needs to be fixed," said Hunter Hughes, 15, so decided he was going to help find a solution.


The high school freshman and accomplished Boy Scout is recruiting participants for a once in a lifetime cancer study by the American Cancer Society.


"They're looking for 300,000 participants nationwide and they're looking for a large number of people in this area, because this area has a big problem with cancer," said Hunter Hughes a freshman at Wyoming Seminary.


This effort will help hunter earn his Eagle Scout status, but it's more than that. It's in honor of his mother, a breast cancer survivor.


"It was very emotional for me. This was something he chose. He said cancer has touched our family so much I really want to make a difference," said Kathryn Hughes, Hunter's mother. He was only five when she was diagnosed.


"I went in for my mammogram, just another day, wasn't too worried about it and they said you can't leave," said Kathryn. Doctors told Kathryn she needed emergency surgery. Nine years after a difficult fight, she  is cancer free.


"It means a lot to me that she can be here today. It's a great testament to the doctors that helped her. She had two almost fatal allergic reactions to chemotherapy," said Hunter. "I had a lot to fight for; I had three small boys. I had to fight extra hard to be here because it matters," said his mom.

That's what Hunter told the Wilkes-Barre Rotary Club. It's one of many groups he has been talking to over the last few weeks. He's handing out interest forms, hoping to get people to decide to join the study called "Cancer Prevention Study-3."


"This study is trying to figure out why people get cancer." said Hunter.


It's simple to sign up; head to the Relay for Life Wyoming Valley, June 15th at King's College Athletic Fields in Wilkes-Barre Township.


Eligible participants have to be between 30 and 65 years old, and have never been diagnosed with cancer. At the relay you'll donate a small amount of blood and a confidential waist measurement. Every two to three years you'll update your health with the American Cancer Society.


Hunter and his mom, are encouraging people to enter the study in honor of a loved one. The goal- so no one has to hear "you have cancer" ever again.


"Just a small investment of time; in the time that you could get a pizza delivered to your house, you could make a difference," said Kathryn.

For more information on the study, visit ACS Cancer Study


And don't forget to remind your buddy to do a breast self-exam.

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