Newsmakers to Air Sunday: Bloomsburg University Featured

Two exciting programs on the campus of Bloomsburg University will be the topic of discussion on this Sunday’s Newsmakers program.

 

   Hosts Jayne Ann Bugda and Andy Mehalshick will be joined  by James Brown, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Joseph Hazzard, Ed.D., ATC, Director, Institute for Concussion Research and Services.
 Dr. Brown will discuss the new Anchor Program at Bloomsburg University. 

The program gives children in the foster care program a chance to explore their academic interests through a multi-year summer residential college life experience.


Dr. Joseph Hazzard will join the conversation to discuss the University’s Institute for Concussion Research and Services. 

The institute is involved in several studies that are helping the medical profession and sports teams understand concussions.  

 


 

Newsmakers will air Sunday, July 9 at 6:30 am on WYOU.  The Program will also air on Sunday, July 16 at noon on WBRE.  

Learn More about Bloomsburg University: Website

 

Bloomsburg University Fast Facts

Bloomsburg University was established in 1839 as a literary academy.

56 undergraduate programs and more than 58 minors along with 20 graduate programs

3rd largest school of the 14 universities in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education

Anchor Program:

The Anchor Program   gives children in the foster care program a chance to explore their academic interests through a multi-year summer residential college life experience.

The Anchor Program  is open to youth involved in the Pennsylvania foster care system and  reside in Columbia, Luzerne, Snyder, Northumberland, and Union counties.

40 youngsters will be accepted into the Anchor residential college life experience program in 2017.

  Information on the  Anchor  Progra

 Call 570-389-4806 or via email at randers3@bloomu.edu.

 

Bloomsburg University’s Institute for Concussion Research and Services

 

The institute has two main goals: to give medical professionals a better understanding of concussions

 Provide a service to the medical community that will assist them in making better “return-to-play” decisions.

 

 

Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania is continuing its role in a nationwide study with the NCAA on concussions with a key part being played by its clinical athletic training students, giving them a gratifying glimpse into their future career field.

A team led by Joseph Hazzard, director of BU’s Institute for Concussion Research and Services and its clinical athletic training education program, recently spent a week at the United States Military Academy in West Point, N.Y, assisting with baseline testing of cadets. The concussion screenings are the initial data point for this summer’s phase of the NCAA-Department of Defense Concussion Assessment, Research and Education (C.A.R.E.) Consortium. 

The study, now in its fourth year, includes 30 schools nationwide.

Hazzard said the cadets were assessed on balance utilizing the Balance Error Scoring System and were administered the Standardized Assessment of Concussion Test at the same station. In addition, they were administered the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Test. The group of tested cadets included those who participate in athletics for West Point from a variety of sports including both genders, according Hazzard.

In its three years, the study has enrolled more than 28,000 participants, including student-athletes at 26 campuses and students at four military academies. More than 1,600 concussions have been recorded, nearly 300 in football alone, according to the CARE Consortium. Of those 1,600 injuries, the consortium says almost 150 have taken place at schools that are part of the study’s advanced research core, where student-athletes take part in neuroimaging, genetic testing and blood draws at predetermined intervals following an injury.

The advanced research core also is testing uninjured student-athletes from contact and noncontact sports to serve as control groups to determine the effects of exposure to lower-level impacts. Early data suggest these lower-intensity hits — like those routinely experienced by football linemen — could have a cumulative effect that can lead to injury, though the subject requires more analysis. 

The CARE research is part of the landmark $30 million NCAA-U.S. Department of Defense Grand Alliance, which is funding the most comprehensive study of concussion and head impact exposure ever conducted. The alliance also supports an educational grand challenge aimed at changing important concussion safety behaviors and the culture of concussion reporting and management.

 


Don't Miss

  • Hometown Heroes
    Copyright 2017 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
  • No TXT Nepa
    Copyright 2017 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
  • My Favorite Book
    Copyright 2017 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
  • Survivor Casting Call 2017
    Copyright 2017 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
  • Going for the Gold in 2018
    Copyright 2017 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Trending Stories

Latest News

Video Center